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Research Grants - 2005


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Research Grants 2005


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2005 Grant - Luchsinger

Cognition in the IDEATel Diabetes Trial

Jose A. Luchsinger, M.D.
Columbia University Medical Center
New York, New York

2005 Investigator-Initiated Research Grant

There is growing evidence that diabetes predisposes individuals to develop Alzheimer's disease, and that individuals who take the most insulin are at the greatest risk. However, it is not known how the control of diabetes, whether by diet or insulin treatment, affects the risk of developing Alzheimer's disease. Considering the increasing proportion of the older population with diabetes, there is a need to address these issues.

A consortium of medical centers and the Center for Medicare Services are currently conducting a four-year trial to study the benefit of a telephone-based treatment program to bring diabetes treatment to people living in remote rural areas and inner-city communities. The study is called the Informatics for Diabetes Education and Telemedicine (IDEAtel) Diabetes Trial.

Jose A. Luchsinger, M.D., and colleagues are currently evaluating subjects from this study during their first follow-up visit with a battery of tests to detect the onset of Alzheimer's disease or mild cognitive impairment. The research team will continue these assessments in the second and third follow-up visits of IDEAtel and until its completion in 2008. In addition, they will measure blood concentrations of beta-amyloid, a protein fragment that may be a key toxic factor in Alzheimer's disease.

They investigators hope to determine whether there are any patterns of association among type of diabetes treatment, measures of diabetes control and the onset of cognitive impairment or Alzheimer's disease. This study may yield valuable information about diabetes and Alzheimer's disease risk and the potential of modifying such risks.