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Research Grants - 2006


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Research Grants 2006


To view an abstract, select an author from the vertical list on the left.

2006 Grant - Teigland

New Quality of Life Measures to Improve Dementia Care in Nursing Homes

Christie L. Teigland, Ph.D.
Foundation for Long Term Care, Inc.
Albany, New York

2006 Investigator-Initiated Research Grant

An estimated 50 percent of residents in nursing homes have moderate to severe dementia. Studies suggest that such individuals have significantly lower quality of life than other nursing home residents.

Christie Teigland, Ph.D., and colleagues have developed quality-of-life measures for people with Alzheimer's disease and other dementias. Their studies have shown that these residents, compared with residents with healthy cognitive function are:

  • 4 to 5 times more likely to experience behavioral symptoms, depression and mobility decline
  • 2.5 times less likely to have their pain documented, even though they have the same prevalence of pain-related conditions
  • Considerably more likely to be prescribed antipsychotics, often with few or no benefits, and suffer higher rates of antipsychotic-related adverse outcomes (e.g., falls, delirium, incontinence and functional decline)
  • Significantly less likely to be diagnosed and treated for osteoporosis

In this current project, the investigators will implement and evaluate their quality-of-life measures at 100 nursing homes. Each nursing home staff will have Web-based access to quality-of-life measures and benchmarks designed to improve clinical decision-making and care intervention for people with dementia. Evaluation of each nursing home will assess whether access to this dementia-specific, quality-of-life data resulted in measurable improvements for residents compared with residents in other nursing homes.

Results from this investigation may establish better tools for assessing quality of life and improving dementia care in nursing homes.