Donate by 12/31
Research Grants - 2007


Alzheimer's Assocation Research only
All of alz.org
  • Go to Alz.org
  • Research Center
  • AAIC
  • ISTAART
  • Journal
  • Grants
  • TrialMatch
  • Press
  • Donate
  • Contact Us
Home
Science and Progress
Clinical Trials
Funding and Collaboration
You can Help
Stay Current
Video and Resources

Text Size

Small text Medium text Large text

Research Grants 2007


To view an abstract, select an author from the vertical list on the left.

2007 Grant - Dickerson

Ultrahigh-Resolution MRI of Medial Temporal Lobe in MCI: A Pilot Study

Bradford Dickerson, M.D.
Massachusetts General Hospital
Charlestown, Massachusetts

2007 New Investigator Research Grant

The medial temporal lobe is a region of the brain that is critical for memory function in humans. Studies of brains from persons who have died from various causes suggest that the medial temporal lobe undergoes a series of changes during the development of mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Mild cognitive impairment is a term used to describe the impairment in brain function that precedes Alzheimer's disease and other forms of dementia.

So far, it has not been possible to understand the sequence of events underlying MCI because the studies have relied on the use of brain tissue from deceased donors, each of which shows the disease process at only one point in time. Bradford Dickerson, M.D., and colleagues have developed magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) methods that are capable of imaging in great detail the brains of living persons. The advantage of this method is that an individual brain can be imaged and studied numerous times during disease progression.

Dr. Dickerson and colleagues plan to continue their development of MRI methods and begin using them to study the fine detail of the medial temporal lobe in people diagnosed with MCI. They expect to be able to image small, specialized regions of the brain that are believed to undergo very early changes in the course of disease. These studies will improve our understanding of the earliest events in disease development, and they may provide valuable tools for early diagnosis and for monitoring the efficacy of treatment.