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Research Grants - 2008


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Research Grants 2008


To view an abstract, select an author from the vertical list on the left side.

2008 Grants - Emerson-Lombardo

Nutritional Supplement Clinical Trial for Early Alzheimer's Disease

Nancy B. Emerson-Lombardo, Ph.D.
Boston University
Bedford, Massachusetts

2008 Investigator-Initiated Research Grant

A growing body of evidence suggests that proper diet may help prevent or delay the onset of Alzheimer's disease. Clinical trials with both animals and humans have shown that specially designed diets can slow cognitive decline in people with early Alzheimer's. Such diets may prove more effective at fighting Alzheimer's than certain drug therapies.

Nancy B. Emerson-Lombardo, Ph.D., and colleagues have designed a nutrition program that could reduce Alzheimer risk in adults and slow the disease's progression in people with early-stage Alzheimer's. This diet includes increased amounts of Omega-3 and B vitamins, a variety of antioxidants, and foods that lower LDL—or "bad"—cholesterol.

For their proposed study, the researchers have identified three nutritional supplements that, taken together, approximate the nutritional content of their diet plan. This dietary supplement combination is named the Memory Preservation Nutrition Supplement Program (MPNSP). Dr. Emerson-Lombardo's team will administer the MPNSP for 12 months to a group of adults with early Alzheimer's. They will then test the treatment's ability to prevent such Alzheimer-related symptoms as brain inflammation, insulin resistance and excessive clumping of the protein fragment beta-amyloid. Results of the study could lead to the development of effective and safe dietary therapies for dementia.