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Research Grants 2011


To view an abstract, select an author from the vertical list on the left.

2011 Grants - Bateman

A Blood Isotope Labeled Amyloid-Beta Test for Alzheimer's Disease

Randall J. Bateman, M.D.
Washington University in St. Louis
St. Louis, Missouri

2011 Zenith Fellows Award

Beta-amyloid is a protein fragment strongly implicated in Alzheimer's disease. Aggregates of beta-amyloid in the brain form amyloid plaques, one of the characteristic features of Alzheimer pathology. Scientists are investigating whether levels of beta-amyloid in the brain or blood stream may predict the onset of disease.

Randall J. Bateman, M.D., and colleagues have developed a way to measure beta-amyloid in the cerebrospinal fluid, the fluid that surrounds nerve cells in the brain. Using this method, known as stable isotope labeling kinetics (SILK), Dr. Bateman's research team has shown that the rate of clearance of beta-amyloid from the brain is reduced in persons with early Alzheimer's disease compared to healthy persons of the same age.

Dr. Bateman and colleagues have extended their method to allow them to measure beta-amyloid levels in the blood. They have proposed to use this method to measure the production and clearance of beta-amyloid in the blood, comparing persons with Alzheimer's disease to healthy controls. They also plan to study how the production and clearance of beta-amyloid in the blood compares with those processes in the brain. These studies will advance understanding of how the body produces and disposes of beta-amyloid, and how changes in those processes affect the development of disease. They may also lead to the creation of tests that can be used in the clinic to detect or diagnose Alzheimer's disease.