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Research Grants 2011


To view an abstract, select an author from the vertical list on the left.

2011 Grants - Eaves

Caregiving Transitions in Alzheimer's Disease for Rural African-Americans

Yvonne D. Eaves, Ph.D.
Kennesaw State University
Kennesaw, Georgia

2011 Senator Mark Hatfield Award in Clinical Research

Because Alzheimer's disease is a progressive condition, individuals experience many transitions in the course of the disease — transitions related to their level of independence, living conditions, need for healthcare services, and other factors. Caregivers must also negotiate these transitions. Although studies have examined how Americans living in urban settings experience the transitions associated with Alzheimer's disease, much less is known about how rural residents do so.

Older Americans of African descent are more likely to have chronic illnesses and disabilities, including Alzheimer's disease, compared to older Americans of European descent. However, little is known about how rural AfricanAmericans and their families manage the transitions associated with the progression of Alzheimer's disease. Such information is vital to ensure that necessary services are provided in the most appropriate way.

Yvonne D. Eaves, Ph.D. and colleagues have proposed to study the transitions experienced by rural AfricanAmericans affected by Alzheimer's disease and their families, and caregivers. The researchers will also study how these individuals and families make decisions about living conditions, health care and other important aspects of caring for an individual with Alzheimer's disease. The knowledge gained by this study should improve the ability of healthcare providers and service providers to meet the needs of rural AfricanAmericans affected by Alzheimer's disease.