Blog  Facebook  Twitter


Go to ALZ Site Español 中文 Chinese 日本語 Japanese 한국어 Korean Tiếng Việt Vietnamese About Us Contact Us Donate
Alzheimer's disease information and resources
24/7 helpline
800.272.3900
Share | Print
Text Size Small text Medium text Large text
10 Warning Signs
Why Get Checked
Behaviors
Find your chapter
Find your chapter
Search By State

Behaviors

Introduction
Aggression
Wandering
Anxiety or agitation
Confusion
Hallucinations
Repetition
Sundowning and sleep problems
Suspicion

Introduction

Alzheimer's causes changes in the brain that can change the way a person acts. Some individuals with Alzheimer's become anxious or aggressive. Others repeat certain questions and gestures. Many misinterpret what they see or hear. It is important to understand that the person is not acting this way on purpose or trying to annoy you.

Challenging behaviors can interfere with daily life, sleep and may lead to frustration and tension. The key to dealing with behaviors is: 1) determine the triggers 2) have patience and respond in a calm and supporting way and 3) find ways to prevent the behaviors from happening.

Aggression

Aggressive behaviors may be verbal (shouting, name-calling) or physical (hitting, pushing). They can occur suddenly, with no apparent reason, or can result from a frustrating situation. Whatever the case, it is important to try to understand what is causing the person to become angry or upset. Triggers for aggression can include a medical problem, a noisy environment or pain.

Wandering

It is common for individuals with dementia to wander and become lost. They often have a purpose or goal in mind, such as searching for a lost object, trying to fulfill a former job responsibility or wanting to "go home" even when at home. However, wandering can be dangerous, resulting in serious injury or death. Help keep your elder safe and enroll in MedicAlert ® + Alzheimer's Association Safe Return ®, a nationwide identification program designed to assist in the return of those who wander and become lost. See Safety Center to learn more about wandering and other safety issues.

Anxiety or agitation

The person may feel anxious or agitated, or may become restless and need to move around or pace. The person may become upset in certain places or focused on specific details. He or she may also cling to a certain caregiver for attention and direction.

Confusion

The person may not recognize familiar people, places or things. He or she may forget relationships, call family members by other names or become confused about where home is. The person may also forget the purpose of common items, such as a pen or a fork.

Hallucinations

When individuals with Alzheimer's disease have a hallucination, they see, hear, smell, taste or feel something that isn't there. The person may see the face of a former friend in a curtain or may hear people talking. If the hallucination doesn't cause problems, you may want to ignore it. However, if they happen continuously, see a doctor to determine if there is an underlying physical cause.

Repetition

The person with Alzheimer's may do or say something over and over again – like repeating a word, question or activity. In most cases, he or she is probably looking for comfort, security and familiarity. The person may also pace or undo what has just been finished. These actions are rarely harmful to the person with Alzheimer's but can be stressful for the caregiver.

Sundowning and sleep problems

The person may experience periods of increased confusion, anxiety and agitation beginning at dusk and continuing throughout the night. This is called sundowning. Experts are not sure what causes it, but there are factors that can contribute to the behavior, such as end-of-day exhaustion or less need for sleep, which is common among older adults.

Suspicion

Memory loss and confusion may cause the person with Alzheimer's to perceive things in new, unusual ways. Individuals may become suspicious of those around them, even accusing others of theft, infidelity or other improper behavior. Sometimes the person may also misinterpret what he or she sees and hears.


Next: 10 Warning Signs

소개
공격성
배회
불안 또는 동요
혼동
환각
반복
일몰 불안증 및 수면 문제
의심

소개

알츠하이머 병은 뇌의 변화를 야기하여 환자가 전혀 다른 행동을 보일 수 있습니다. 알츠하이머 병에 걸린 일부 환자는 불안해하고 또는 공격적이 될 수 있습니다. 특정 질문과 동작을 반복하는 사람도 있습니다. 많은 환자가 보거나 들은 것을 잘못 해석합니다. 환자가 일부러 이렇게 행동하거나 당신을 괴롭히려는 의도가 없다는 것을 이해하는 것이 중요합니다.

곤란한 행동은 일상 생활 및 수면을 방해할 수 있고 좌절과 긴장을 유발할 수 있습니다. 이러한 행동을 다루기 위해서 1) 촉발 요인을 판단하고 2) 인내심을 갖고 차분하고 지지적인 방식으로 대응하며 3) 그런 행동들이 일어나지 않도록 미리 막는 방법을 찾는 것이 중요합니다.

공격성

공격적 행동은 구두적(고함, 욕설) 또는 물리적(치기, 밀기)일 수 있습니다. 공격적 행동은 분명한 이유 없이 갑자기 발생하거나 불만스러운상황에 기인할 수 있습니다. 어떠한 경우든 환자를 화나게 하는원인을 이해하려고 노력하는 것이 중요합니다. 공격성의 촉발 요인에는 의료 문제, 소란스러운 환경 또는 통증이 있습니다.

배회

치매 환자가 배회하다가 길을 잃는 경우가 흔합니다. 환자는 종종 분실물을 찾거나, 이전 직무를 이행하거나, 집에 있으면서도 "집으로 가려는" 것과 같은목표 또는 목적을 마음에 갖고 있습니다. 그러나 배회는 위험하며 심한 부상 또는 사망을 야기할 수 있습니다. 귀하의 어르신을 안전하게 보호하기 위해 배회하다가 길을 잃는 분들의 귀가를 돕는 전국적 식별 프로그램인 MedicAlert ® + Alzheimer's Association Safe Return ®에 등록하십시오. 배회 및 기타 안전 문제에 대한 상세 정보는 Safety Center (안전센터)를 참조하십시오.

불안 또는 동요

환자가 불안하고 동요하거나 안절부절 못하고 주변을 돌아다니거나 왔다 갔다할 수도 있습니다. 환자가 특정 장소에서 기분이 언잖아지거나 특정 세부사항에 집중하게 될 수 있습니다. 또한 관심과 지시를 받기 위해서 어떤 한 부양인에게 매달릴 수도 있습니다.

혼동

환자가 익숙한 사람, 장소 또는 물건을 인식하지 못할 수 있습니다. 환자는 사람들과의 관계를 잊고, 가족을 다른 이름으로 부르거나, 집이 어디 있는지에 대해 혼동할 수 있습니다. 또한 연필 또는 숟가락 같은 흔한 물건의 용도를 잊을 수도 있습니다.

환각

알츠하이머병에 걸린 사람에게 환각이 있다는 것은 존재하지 않는 것을 보거나, 듣거나, 냄새 맡거나, 맛보거나, 느낀다는 것입니다. 알츠하이머환자는 커튼에서 이전 친구의 얼굴을 보거나 사람들의 이야기 소리를 들을 수도 있습니다. 환각이 문제를 야기하지 않는다면 무시하는 것이 좋습니다. 그러나 환각이 지속적으로 발생한다면 기저의 신체적 원인이 있는지 판단하기 위해 의사에게 찾아가십시오.

반복

알츠하이머병에 걸린 사람은 어떤 것을 몇 번이고 다시 하거나 말할 수 있습니다(예로, 어떤 단어, 질문 또는 활동을 반복). 대부분의 경우에 환자는 편안, 안전 및 익숙한 것을 찾고 있을지 모릅니다. 또한 왔다 갔다 하거나 방금 완성한 것을 원상태로 돌릴 수 있습니다. 이러한 행동이 알츠하이머병 환자에게 해로운 경우는 드물지만 부양인에게는 스트레스가 될 수 있습니다.

일몰 불안증 및 수면 문제

환자는 해질녁에 시작하여 밤새도록혼동, 불안 및 흥분이 고조되는 것을 경험할 수 있습니다. 이것을 일몰 불안증이라고 합니다. 일몰 불안증세의 원인은 알려져 있지 않지만, 에 으로 일과종료 시 피로함 또는 수면이 덜 필요함과 같은노인들에게서 많이 볼 수 있는 요인들이 일몰 불안행동에 기여를 할 수 있습니다.

의심

기억 상실 및 혼동으로 인해 알츠하이머병 환자는 사물을 새롭고 특이한 방식으로 인식할 수 있습니다. 주위사람들을 의심하게 되고, 심지어 남을 절도, 부정 또는 기타 부적절한 행동을 했다고 비난할 수도 있습니다. 때때로 보고 듣는 것을 잘못 해석할 수도 있습니다.


다음: 10가지 경고 징후

Alzheimer's Association National Office 225 N. Michigan Ave., Fl. 17, Chicago, IL 60601
Alzheimer's Association is a not-for-profit 501(c)(3) organization.

© 2018 Alzheimer's Association. All rights reserved.